By creekmoremarketing 30 Jul, 2015
The 7(a) Loan Program, SBA’s most common loan program, includes financial help for businesses with special requirements. Learn more about the 7a loan program by watching the short video below.
By creekmoremarketing 29 Jul, 2015
By creekmoremarketing 29 Jul, 2015

Are all Your Customers Created Equal?


“The customer is always right.”
“We have to take care of the customer no matter what.”
“The customer focused business is a successful business.”


We’ve all heard or probably said those things.


Have you ever had a customer that you were always happy to see and were happy to see you? Your transactions always went well, were profitable and they never complained about price, paid on time or early and generally were a pleasure to work with. You probably found yourself looking for ways to make them even happier, right?  This was why you started this business, right?


Then there’s the customer that complains about everything, never happy, never satisfied, complains about the price, demands discounts, pays late, and is overly demanding. Everything is a crisis and is never his fault. Your stomach tightens and you can feel the perspiration on your forehead the moment you see his number on the caller ID. It shouldn’t be this hard. It would be great if you didn’t have to deal with this customer but sales are sales and you just have to put up with it.


Wouldn’t it be great if all customers were like our best customer? How great would it be to only have to deal with the great customers? Well, maybe it’s time to fire some of those pain-in-the-neck customers and, believe me, this will be one of the hardest things you’ll ever do. We as business owners only think about that next customer, that next sale. If we take a deeper look, we may see that all customers are not created equally and, more importantly, some customers are not worth having.


We’ve all heard of the Pareto Principle, that 80% of our revenue usually comes from 20% of our customers. What if there was a way to use the Pareto Principle to really concentrate on your best customers, meet their needs efficiently and have plenty of time to think of ways to make their experience with you better. What if you could forget about all those other customers that are constantly complaining and demanding this or that taking up far too much of your time. There is – fire those customers!


So how do you know which are the best customers to get rid of?


Try these steps to identify customers you may want to fire:
1. Copy your customer list down the first column on an Excel spreadsheet.
2. Across the top columns, list all the attributes of a great customer: profit generator, pays on time or early, orders regularly, etc.
3. In each attribute, rate the customer from 1 – 5 with 1 being worst and 5 being best. After the last column sum the row to get that customer’s score. You can then use the sort function to sort your list from best to worst by using the sum column.


Now that you’ve objectively identified your problem customers, you have to come up with a plan. Here are some strategies to think about:


Fix what you can fix. Review each problem customer and think about all the things that cause you pain. Are there ways that this customer can be saved? What can be done to eliminate the problems? Maybe there are solutions that can be used to save the relationship.


Be honest. You don’t want your customer bad mouthing you to other potential customers so you need to be very sensitive as you explain your decision. Tell the customer that you have worked hard to service their needs but feel they would be a better fit elsewhere. Refer them to a competitor and make the introduction for them. Follow up to make sure that the transition went well.


Don’t look back. You’ll miss the lost revenue at first but the extra time will allow you to focus on maximizing sales from your remaining customers. The most likely outcome will be a drop in sales but usually your gross profit will hold steady.


Look in the mirror. If you seem to continually attract the customer from hell, perhaps the problem is you. Maybe your marketing is not targeting your ideal customer. If you did the customer analysis you should know who your ideal customer is now. Test different marketing tactics to attract only that customer.

By creekmoremarketing 29 Jul, 2015
Get Your Business Online.
By creekmoremarketing 29 Jul, 2015

Several years ago, the business I owned at that time was struggling and finding cash just to operate was a daily problem. Needless to say, I wasn’t sleeping very well. One day, my CPA called and said the company’s tax return was ready and wanted me to stop by and go over it. When I arrived at his office, he had a big smile on his face as he extended his arm to shake my hand.


“Fantastic job,” he said, “you’ve really turned this company around and I’m impressed how profitable it now is.”


Me, profitable? I had just been wondering how I was going to find enough cash to make payroll on Friday. I decided to come clean with him.


“The truth is, I probably don’t deserve your praise because I don’t have enough cash to make payroll on Friday and I’m really not sure I can keep the doors open for much longer,” I said looking down in shame. “How can I be profitable when I don’t have any money? Where did it all go?”


He was quiet for a few moments. Slowly, he picked up the tax return and slipped it into a big white envelope with his company logo emblazoned on it and placed it on the desk in front of me.


“Do you know the difference between cash and profit?” he asked quietly.


“What do you mean? Aren’t they the same?”


“Not at all,” he said. “Let me explain. Profit is only an accounting term used to define the result of the accounting equation: Sales minus cost of sales and expenses equal profit. It’s very simple. We sell something, pay our bills and whatever is leftover we call profit.”


“Cash, however, is not generated by some equation. Cash is generated only through the receipt of cash in some manner, either through sales, borrowing or taking in investment dollars. When we pay our expenses, whether they are for equipment, materials, labor or taxes, we must use cash to do so. For example, when your company gets a new contract, you usually have to buy about $20,000 worth of equipment to place at the new customer’s location before you get the first new sales dollar. And, you need to pay those suppliers off in about 60 days, correct? And, you won’t bring in enough profit in those 60 days to pay that bill, correct?” He paused so I could think about this.


“Now, on your profit and loss statement, it will show that you had both an increase in sales and an increase in profit. You as the business owner spend most of your time trying to grow your business by increasing customers and sales. The problem, and one that most business owners fail to realize, is that increased sales cost money.”


“Most businesses need new assets to support an increase in sales and these new assets need to be paid for usually before the new sales can generate sufficient profit to cover the increased cost. Sometimes it is new equipment, new staff or a big order of materials. Sales growth has to be planned and, fortunately, there are tools that you can use to make sure you can afford to grow and take advantage of new opportunities.”


“Let me ask you this,” he asked, “how do you decide what bills to pay and when?” he asked.


“Well, lately I go online and check the bank balance and will pay whoever is calling and threatening the most,” I said being very honest.


“That’s what I thought,” he chuckled. “Cash is the most precious resource that any business possesses. You have to plan carefully who you pay this week as well as the rest of the month, next three months and the year. The only way to do this is to forecast your cash inflows and outflows on a weekly and plan 13 weeks forward. It can be hard at first, but if you do this habitually, you will be able to predict when you will be short on cash and hopefully find ways around the shortfall.”


“You mentioned ‘tools’ that I should be using to plan my cash inflows and outflows. What are they?” I asked.
He pulled out a single piece of paper from the top drawer of his desk and handed it to me. It was a copy of a spreadsheet with 14 columns and was full of numbers.


“This is my firm’s cash forecast and we use it every week. I’ll send you a blank template that you can customize for your company,” he replied. “Try it for a couple of weeks and if you get stuck, give me a call and I’ll help,” he said as he stood up.
I knew my time was up and shaking his hand, I thanked him again and again.


This is a true story and learning how to forecast my cash inflows and outflows allowed me to grow my business methodically and kept me sane. If this is your story too, send me an email and I will be happy to send you a template that you can use to forecast your cash. If you need help to get started, call our office. Once I started using the template, it wasn’t long before I was sleeping much better.

David Oetken
Director Louisville SBDC

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By Robbi Meisel 22 Sep, 2015
LEXINGTON, Ky., (Sept. 22, 2015) –The Kentucky Small Business Development Center announced David Stevens, principal accountant, as the recipient of the 2015 Sutton Landry State Star for Kentucky. Stevens was recognized at a private reception during the recent America’s SBDC Conference in San Francisco.

The America’s SBDC honors a state star from each SBDC annually. The award is presented to an individual who is considered an example of excellence, makes a significant contribution to their center’s program and exhibits dedication to assisting small businesses.

“I was honored to accept the state star award at the ASBDC annual conference. I want to give special thanks to our State Director, Becky Naugle, for giving me this wonderful award and opportunity,” Stevens said. “In addition to receiving the award I was given a special tour of Silicon Valley visiting Intuit, Google and Facebook. It was a very educational opportunity which I will never forget.”

Naugle said, “This award is a wonderful way to honor David’s dedication and exemplary service to the small business community and KSBDC.”

Stevens began working at the University of Kentucky in 1980 and joined the KSBDC as the principal accountant in 1989. He is a UK graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting.

His dedication to crunching the numbers, proposal preparation and superb budgeting has contributed to the many successes the organization has realized over the past three decades. During his tenure, the network of Kentucky SBDC offices has been noted for extraordinary work, receiving statewide recognition for performance and productivity.

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 15 offices located throughout the state that helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, .

Photo provided by the Kentucky Small Business Development Center - 2015 State Star Award winners at ASBDC Conference in San Francisco, CA ©KSBDC

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.
By creekmoremarketing 31 Jul, 2015

LEXINGTON, Ky., (May 6, 2015)   – The commonwealth’s best were celebrated in the Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort on May 6 with an awards ceremony recognizing outstanding small businesses and small-business people. Kentucky Celebrates Small Business was presented by the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, the Kentucky district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Lexington chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners.

“Small Business Week is big in Kentucky! These three organizations share the mission of supporting and encouraging small business and are proud to celebrate the wonderful entrepreneurial talent in Kentucky,” said Becky Naugle, KSBDC director.KSBDC selects Kentucky Pacesetter businesses based on how the nominees are changing Kentucky’s economic landscape by introducing innovative products, increasing sales and/or production, boosting employment and serving their communities.

This year’s outstanding Kentucky Pacesetters are:
• A.C.E. Compressor Services Inc., Mayfield
• Green River Appliance, Owensboro
• Stewart and Stafford Inc., Pikeville
• Sustainment Solutions Inc., Lancaster

Each year, the U.S. Small Business Administration recognizes outstanding small businesses and entrepreneurs with awards across the country. The Small Business of the Year winner from each state has the opportunity to be acknowledged at both regional and national levels.

The 2015 Kentucky Small Business Administration award winners are:
• Kentucky Small Business Person of the Year: Scott Shinn, president and CEO of Sustainment Solutions Inc.
• Kentucky 8(a) Graduate of the Year: Kathy Mills, president and CEO of Strategic Communications
• Kentucky SBA Resource Partner of the Year: David Oetken, director of Small Business Development Center Louisville
• Kentucky Financial Services Advocate of the Year: Mark Strother, president and CEO of Commercial Bank of Grayson
• Kentucky Home Based Business of the Year: Nicole Mueller, president and owner of Startup Productions LLC
• Kentucky Woman Small Business Advocate of the Year: Michelle Gorman, small business specialist at U.S. Bank of Bowling Green
• Kentucky Young Entrepreneur of the Year: Shane Hamilton, president and owner of Service Maids LLC

“Entrepreneurs are the engines who drive our economy forward,” said Ralph Ross, district director of the Kentucky office of the U.S. Small Business Administration. “Every year we honor them during Small Business Week, and this year we have an extra reason to celebrate. The Kentucky unemployment rate has dropped to 5.1 percent, and demand for SBA loans has increased 30 percent over last year. Our Kentucky entrepreneurs are hard at work, and we cannot thank them enough.”

The Lexington chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners strives to propel female entrepreneurs to spheres of economic, social and political influence through strengthening economic development, creating innovative and effective changes in the business culture, building strategic alliances and transforming public policies.

Their Winners’ Circle Award is presented annually to a Kentucky woman who has shown outstanding leadership, financial stamina and control, contributed to her community through time and resources, understands and resolves complex issues, and is dedicated to furthering women in business through personal support and mentoring. The 2015 recipient is Dr. Ardis Dee Hoven, past president of the American Medical Association and a Lexington-based infectious disease physician.

The chapter also presented the following awards:
• Woman Business Owner of the Year: Dr. Jennifer Fuson, owner of Lexington Women’s Health
• Member of the Year: Karen Boone, owner of Kreations by Karen
• Tribute Award: Ericka Harney, executive director of Accounting and Financial Women’s Alliance
• Rising Star Award: Kelly King Bakehorn, owner and president of The Grand Reserve and The Barrel House
• Legacy Award: Kathy Gornik, president and CEO of Aperture Consulting

“With the latest census statistics showing that the majority of all workers in America are employed by small-business owners, we are reminded that small-business owners are the true unsung heroes of our times,” said Janey Moores, NAWBO Lexington chapter awards coordinator. “That same census also shows that women now own at least a third of all businesses in the U.S. As more and more women follow the dreams of their hearts by owning their own businesses, America grows stronger by the day and remains the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 15 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, .

Writer: Roberta Meisel, 859-257-7668

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

By creekmoremarketing 31 Jul, 2015

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 22, 2015) – The Kentucky Procurement Technical Assistance Center and Kentucky Small Business Development Center will host the first GovPro Conference on May 13 at The Campbell House in Lexington. Doors will open at 7:30 a.m. and the conference will run until 4:30 p.m. EDT

“We are very excited to have Mildred Quinley from the Office of Small Business Utilization, U.S. General Services Administration as our luncheon speaker. The office of Small Business Utilization advocates for small businesses, and its mission is to promote increased access to GSA’s nationwide procurement opportunities,” said Dee Dee Harbut, Kentucky Procurement Technical Assistance Center director.

Government procurement professionals from federal, state and local agencies will also be on hand at the trade show to talk about opportunities for small-business owners.

Spending more than $500 billion annually makes the U.S. government the largest consumer of products and services. From purchasing items as simple as soap to the construction of buildings to consulting services, the opportunities for businesses to expand their revenue through government contracts are vast. Networking and understanding the “how to” is the purpose of the GovPro conference.

“The Kentucky SBDC continues to strengthen the local economy by offering educational and networking opportunities such as the GovPro conference to small-business owners seeking to grow their revenues with government contracts,” said Shirie Hawkins, Bluegrass SBDC director.

Among the features of the conference will be the breakout sessions led by experienced professionals with solid working knowledge of the procurement process and regulations. Session topics will include: How to Market to the Federal Government, Construction and Architect-Engineer Contracts, An Insider’s Insight to the Federal Acquisition Regulation and Accounting Requirements for Federal Contractors.

Along with the workshops, continental breakfast, lunch, a trade show and networking breaks are included for each registered participant. For more information about the GovPro conference or to register, visit or contact Kristy Coates at 859-257-7668. The deadline for registration is May 6.

The Kentucky Procurement Technical Assistance Center falls under the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. KSBDC’s network of 15 offices located throughout the state helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. More information on KSBDC services is available online at .

Writer: Roberta Meisel, 859-257-7668
UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

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