Branding Gone Wrong: 5 Signs You Need to Change Things Up

  • By creekmoremarketing
  • 31 Jul, 2015

Sixty-seven percent of small business owners expect to see some sort of increase in business in 2014, according to a survey by Sensis digital advertising. Strategic, focused branding plays a vital role in growth, so make sure you understand the signs of poor branding practices and establish a logical and appropriate counterattack.

Sign 1: Skewed Goals

Ask yourself this simple question: What are your goals? If any of them are intangible or vague, such as “earn more income” or “pay off XYZ,” you may be suffering from a lack of brand vision.  Take the time to goal-set . Goals need to be time-bound, so any brand vision should be grounded by a timeline. Furthermore, the goal must directly relate to the company, be realistically attainable and be measurable in smaller pieces.

Sign 2: Social Media Flatline

According to Social Media Today, 90 percent of companies use social media, and 74 percent perceive social media as equally or more important than in-person networking. Using social media, however, is not a small commitment you engage in halfway. Proper branding through social media requires multiple angles, such as networking, lead generating, writing and content development. If a company is not incorporating all these angles, then your social media channels simply may not be in line with your branding.

Social media requires a strategic use and growth plan to keep the brand relevant and in the minds of consumers. It is not a throwaway strategy, but the public face of the company. If you suspect you are guilty of the former,  hire a social media strategist  to help you develop and implement specific goals that support your branding efforts.

Sign 3: Is Your Brand Made Clear in a Single Sentence?

A single sentence can not always explain a brand entirely, but it should certainly encapsulate it. Too many brands are attempting to illogically expand their market without making direct connections. TalentZoo recalls the famous Bic brand, the pen company. They added razors and lighters to their line-up, only to then add underwear to the list. The last concept failed, unsurprisingly. It was too far off from the brand’s image.

When expanding, do it logically. Can the brand be summed up with one cohesive thought, and are the products or services lining up under that umbrella of sensibility?

Sign 4: Your Brand Has No Physical Presence

If your brand lacks a physical aspect of any kind, it is time to change things up. Even full digital stores need a physical embodiment of that branding.  Get business cards  and any other marketing collateral that makes sense for your business. Include these items in correspondence and product shipments and hand them out at networking events.

Sign 5: No Unified Color Palette

MotoCMS offers a unique  tutorial on managing color  for a website. The company believes that few colors really match up in a meaningful way or are considered aesthetic “friends.” Designers need to isolate color friends and use them on a consistent basis with the branding. Web design is enchanted by color, and if a brand cannot answer what its dominant color is, and have it visible in nearly all aspects of its design, it is losing a branding opportunity.

Kevin Norvell
Web Project Manager

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By Robbi Meisel 06 Jan, 2017

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Jan. 5, 2017) – The Kentucky Small Business Development Center significantly contributed to the state and federal economy during the 2014-15 fiscal year, according to an independent study conducted by James J. Chrisman, professor of management, Mississippi State University. The study was completed in June 2016 and shows that small businesses working with the center increased sales and employment figures at a greater percentage than an average business in Kentucky. KSBDC clients increased sales by 14.4 percent versus 3.8 percent, and increased employment levels by 15.1 percent compared to 1.5 percent.

Other findings from the Chrisman study:

  • KSBDC clients created 1,156 new jobs.
  • For every dollar invested in the program, $2.63 returned to the economy.
  • For every dollar invested in KSBDC counseling services, $9.47 returned to the economy.
  • KSBDC clients obtained $58.9 million in financing.
  • KSBDC clients increased incremental sales in Kentucky by $108.4 million.
  • KSBDC clients generated $8.55 million dollars in state and federal tax revenue.
  • Clients gave KSBDC staff a 4.7 on a 5-point scale for knowledge and expertise.
  • Clients recommended KSBDC services 98 percent of the time.

“KSBDC staff work very hard to serve Kentucky small businesses. We are very proud of the results of this independent, third-party research and are very pleased with the impact produced by our network,” said Becky Naugle, state director.

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, http://www.ksbdc.org/ .

 

Writer: Roberta Meisel , 859-257-7668

 

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

 

By Robbi Meisel 18 Oct, 2016

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Oct. 18, 2016) –The Office of Veterans Business Development recognized Patricia Krausman, director of the Elizabethtown Small Business Development Center, as one of the six most outstanding instructors for the 2016 Boots 2 Business program.

Boots to Business is an entrepreneurial education and training program offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration. It is a training track within the U.S. Department of Defense’s Transition Assistance Program. The curriculum provides valuable assistance for transitioning service members who are exploring business ownership or other self-employment opportunities. The program leads them through the key steps for evaluating business concepts and providing the foundation required to develop a business plan. In addition, participants are introduced to Small Business Administration partners and resources.

The recognition was based on the instructors’ contributions and dedication to the program and to service members, veterans and spouses in their business ownership endeavors. Nominations for this achievement came from Small Business Administration offices across the country.

Krausman has provided business management consulting and training for more than 20 years. In 2009, she developed and served as the director of the Kentucky Small Business Development Center’s Veterans Assistance Program, the resource for veteran business support and advocacy. Additionally, she was chosen as A Veteran’s Small Business Advocate of the Year in 2013 by the Kentucky Small Business Administration. She takes an active role in her work and advocacy, serving as a member of the Kentucky Commission on Small Business Advocacy, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board and the Governor’s Veterans Interagency Task Force. She was awarded the prestigious Kentucky Association for Economic Development Allied Professional of the Year in 2014.

“The Kentucky Small Business Development Center has a long-standing commitment to veterans and veteran-owned businesses. Boots 2 Business is a program specifically designed by the Small Business Administration and its resource partners to ensure that veterans have expert guidance and direction in their path to entrepreneurship,” Krausman said. “It’s an honor to be included in the recognition of outstanding instructors for the national SBA Boots 2 Business program. Veterans are exceptional entrepreneurs, and it is rewarding to have the opportunity to support them in their successful transition to small-business ownership.”

The Kentucky Small Business Development Center, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, http://www.ksbdc.org/ .

 

Photo provided by the Kentucky Small Business Development Center –Patricia Krausman. ©KSBDC

 

Writer: Roberta Meisel , 859-257-7668

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

 

By Robbi Meisel 14 Jun, 2016

LEXINGTON, Ky. – In anticipation of the many business opportunities that could stem from the construction of a new federal prison in Roxana, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, in partnership with Letcher County Fiscal Court, is sponsoring When Opportunity Knocks, a luncheon and resource fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. EDT June 22 at the Pine Mountain Grill in Whitesburg.

During lunch, local business owners will share how they answered the knock of opportunity and found success. The event is free and seating is limited; preregistration is required. Reservations can be made online at http://tinyurl.com/j9rdjtf .

At the event, organizers will discuss a three-part series of training events. Series topics will include general business and government contracting. The first event will take place 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 12 at the Whitesburg campus of Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College. Training will also take place at 6 p.m. July 26 and August 9. Prior to each training event, a resource fair will begin at 4 p.m.

For more information, visit http://www.ksbdc.org/moving-forward-letcher-county or email Shawn Rogers at movingforwardletcher@ksbdc.org .

KSBDC, part of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is a network of 13 offices located throughout the state. The center helps existing and start-up businesses succeed by offering high quality, in-depth and hands-on services. KSBDC is a partner program with the U.S. Small Business Administration. For more information on KSBDC services, visit their website, http://www.ksbdc.org/ .

Other partners include: Kentucky Small Business Development Centers at Pikeville and Ashland, Southeast Small Business Development Center, Small Business Administration, Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, Kentucky Procurement Technical Assistance Center, Southeast Kentucky Economic Development, Kentucky Highlands Investment Corporation, Mountain Association for Community Economic Development, Kentucky Innovation Network – Pikeville , Kentucky River Area Development District, Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, Federation of Appalachian Housing Enterprises Inc. and Kentucky Finance and Administration Cabinet – Minority and Women Business Enterprise Certification.

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